Facebook's new mission statement is more than a philosophy—it's a goal.

“Look around and our society is still so divided. We have a responsibility to do more, not just to connect the world but to bring the world closer together.”—Mark Zuckerberg

It is always inspiring to me when companies (especially hugely influential ones like Facebook) look at their business through the lens of service and not just profit. I truly believe visionary leaders have the ability to use business to help change the world for the better. Nice work Mark Z !!! I love your new mission statement and am rooting for you to reach your goal!  “Give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.”  “For the last decade or so we’ve been focusing on making the world more open and connected. But I used to think that if we just give people a voice and help some people connect that that would make the world a whole lot better by itself,” Zuckerberg admits. “Look around and our society is still so divided. We have a responsibility to do more, not just to connect the world but to bring the world closer together.”  Catalyzed by the fake news scandals surrounding the U.S. presidential election, Zuckerberg first laid the groundwork with his  6,000-word community letter  on  “Building Community,”  which focused on what Facebook could do to help.   “We want to help 1 billion people join meaningful communities. If we can do this it will not only reverse the whole decline in community membership we’ve seen around the world… but it will also strengthen our social fabric and bring the world closer together.”  TO READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE GO TO:   https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/22/bring-the-world-closer-together/

It is always inspiring to me when companies (especially hugely influential ones like Facebook) look at their business through the lens of service and not just profit. I truly believe visionary leaders have the ability to use business to help change the world for the better. Nice work Mark Z !!! I love your new mission statement and am rooting for you to reach your goal!

“Give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.”

“For the last decade or so we’ve been focusing on making the world more open and connected. But I used to think that if we just give people a voice and help some people connect that that would make the world a whole lot better by itself,” Zuckerberg admits. “Look around and our society is still so divided. We have a responsibility to do more, not just to connect the world but to bring the world closer together.”

Catalyzed by the fake news scandals surrounding the U.S. presidential election, Zuckerberg first laid the groundwork with his 6,000-word community letter on “Building Community,” which focused on what Facebook could do to help. 

“We want to help 1 billion people join meaningful communities. If we can do this it will not only reverse the whole decline in community membership we’ve seen around the world… but it will also strengthen our social fabric and bring the world closer together.”

TO READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE GO TO:

https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/22/bring-the-world-closer-together/

Treating Employees Like People Makes Them Work Like Machines

An interesting article on Facebook's efforts to create a strong corporate culture. This pretty much says it all: "It doesn’t matter how great your company is or how awesome your product is, if your manager sucks, you don’t want to be there."

A great article written by Stuart Crabb of Oxegen Consulting

A great article written by Stuart Crabb of Oxegen Consulting

You know that Facebook is one of the world’s best companies to work at. You’ve heard the heavenly details, right? We all have. Some of the less lucky ones dream about them while they scrape the bottom of their company's instant coffee can with a teaspoon, hoping to gather enough dehydrated crumbs to stay awake through the next team meeting.

But the real success of Facebook’s company culture goes deeper than free granola, segways, and ping pong tables. Stuart Crabb – founder of Oxegen Consulting, and Facebook’s former Global Head of Learning – was the chief architect of this legendary work environment, solidifying its reputation and talent during a crucial period in the company’s development. All those recreational gadgets and perks that are part of Facebook’s folklore are really only the most visible layer of a culture that is anchored in something more important: people’s strengths.

According to Crabb, we are unhealthily obsessed with weaknesses and negativity. Bad news headlines are more clickable than good news stories, and out in the real world you only have to observe people slowing down on a freeway to look at a traffic accident to know it’s true. Great novels aren’t written about happy people. A film about the perfect couple will never sell.

There is a negativity bias that pervades our personal, artistic, and corporate worlds: job interviews are often exercises in concealing your weaknesses, and an impending job review brings on a weighty stress about the areas you might be failing, rather than achieving.

Crabb turned that attitude on its head while at Facebook and championed the philosophy that people are at their best when they are allowed to access their strengths. Tapping into an employee’s brilliance and allowing them the opportunity to customize their role results in higher performing teams and individuals, longer employee retention, and a greater sense of fulfillment. Tom Rath, author of the best-selling book StrenghsFinder, also supports this idea: “People who have the opportunity to focus on their strengths every day are six times as likely to be engaged in their jobs and more than three times as likely to report having an excellent quality of life in general.”

Employee engagement is also key, and a lot of that comes down to investing in thoughtful training of managers. “Managers play a key role in driving engagement and we know that the relationship to the manager will always trump the brand,” Crabb says, in Strategic Leadership Review. “Doesn’t matter how great your company is or how awesome your product is, if your manager sucks, you don’t want to be there. And so the appointment of managers and the training of managers is something we take very seriously.”

Crabb encourages all employees to take the Clifton StrengthsFinder test so they can identify their assets and play to their strengths.

To know more, visit Oxegen Consulting

The Warrior's Winning Core Values: Joy, Mindfulness, Compassion and Competition

Jeff Chiu AP Photo

Jeff Chiu AP Photo

The Warriors recently became the first team in NBA history to begin a season 17 - 0. I LOVE that this team has a defined set of meaningful core values that guide them: 

Joy. Mindfulness. Compassion. Competition.

“He [coach Steve Kerr] just reminded everybody, he put them up on the white board before we started shoot-around and he reminded the guys what those values were,” interim coach Luke Walton said. “He emphasized to them how proud he was watching them, because we’re hitting all four of those values. The first one and the most important one is probably joy. He wants us having fun. It’s a long season, this game’s meant to be fun.

“When we hit those four things we’re not only very tough to beat, but we’re very fun to watch, we’re very fun to coach, we’re very fun to be around, and he just told the guys how happy he was that they’re continuing to do those things.”

To read the complete article go to:

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/11/25/kerrs-winning-formula-joy-mindfulness-compassion-competition/

Amazon: When Workplace Culture and Brand Goes Horribly Wrong

Amazon Brand Culture

No matter what is really happening inside the doors of Amazon, Meghan Biro gets it right when she says "despite the fact that this company seems to be as common in many households as running water, it will forever have “ruthless” associated with its employer brand. Let’s see how many super-bright millennials are willing to cross that threshold. This is where it gets dangerous for brands to recover."

To read the complete article go to:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghanbiro/2015/08/21/when-workplace-culture-and-brand-goes-horribly-wrong/

 

Warren Buffett and the Enduring Value of Values

I'm not normally inclined to read books on investing or investors, but a line from a review in the Economist (Jan. 2015) intrigued me:

"Though best-known as a 'value investor', with an eye for underpriced shares, as a manager Mr. Buffett cares mostly about values. He believes that corporate culture matters; if a business does not have a strong, proven ethical culture, he will not buy it, whatever its other attractions."

The book argues that Buffett's success is less about his ability to find value in a company and more about his fierce commitment to a set of core values.

Since this is the kind of thing I love to read about, I may be adding one more book to the pile on my nightstand.

To read the complete article click here

Advice From a Famous Quitter

I am late to the party on this one (20 million views) but who can resist watching a video of a girl quitting her job while dancing around the office? I LOVED it. Marina Shifrin's clever, well executed, video resignation opened up the doors she was looking for—an entrance into the comedy world. Well done Marina!

But employers beware:

Unhappy employees have a greater ability than ever before to influence your brand. Whether its a viral video or a negative post on glassdoor.com—employees are talking and LOTS of people are listening.

Click here to read Marina Shifrin's awesome article.


Don't quit your day job: advice from a famous(ish) quitter

Twitter's Purpose Driven Culture

Niki Lustig, a leader of the Learning and Organizational Development team at Twitter.

Niki Lustig, a leader of the Learning and Organizational Development team at Twitter.

Besides being obviously adorable, Niki Lustig, a leader of the Learning and Organizational Development team at Twitter had some interesting things to say about a sense of purpose at work. She says purpose is crucial not only for Twitter as a whole, but for all the individual teams as well. Two key takeaways from the article:

  1. The importance of challenging leaders and managers to define the purpose of their team's existence

  2. Remembering WHY people came to Twitter in the first place and what they set out to do 

Here's a link to the article that was published by the Greater Good Science Center from UC Berkeley: Can Higher Purpose Help Your Team Survive and Thrive